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Spawn Kills Everyone! Review

Spawn Kills Everyone! Review

Writer: Todd McFarlane
Art: JJ Kirby
Color: FCO Plascenscia
Lettering: Tom Orzechowski
Covers: Todd McFarlane, JJ Kirby, Liana Hee
Editor: Todd McFarlane
Published by Image Comics

At risk of losing all credibility, I'm reviewing Spawn Kills Everyone! because I loved this comic. No, really.

It starts with the cover, with the tiny version of Spawn standing on a pile of skulls. That's how he looks throughout this book. There is no Funko version of Spawn, but that is what he would like, and what he looks like here. He's about two feet tall and oddly proportioned, which just adds to the ridiculousness of the whole thing.

This book is excessively, hilariously violent. It's not trying to be edgy violent, instead seeming to answer "Can you make bloody murder cute?". It keeps raising the stakes, getting more violent and over the top as it goes, both in the kills and what Spawn is saying.

For a murder spree, the plot isn't as thin as you might expect. It's still almost transparent, but there are just enough clever bits to keep it moving. Spawn is going to Comic-Con to announce his movie, and confuses cosplay with other heroes. This leads to his murder spree, which I swear is not as horrific as it sounds.

Instead, it's hilarious for a reason that I didn't expect. I never read any Spawn before, but know by reputation is that it took itself completely seriously. This goes in the opposite direction. The character of Spawn takes himself seriously, but nobody else does, not even the comic he's in. This is irreverence to the highest degree, and the humor there just works.

What amazes me is that this got made in this form. By killing cosplayers, I mean that Spawn is killing Marvel cosplayers. That Marvel agreed to this surprises me. There's also a prominent Adventure Time cameo, which is just as unexpected. Then there's a moment where Spawn mocks Robert Kirkman, but I understand how that happened. Then there's how brutally it mocks McFarlane himself, which is rather surprising considering that he wrote it.

Which gets to something I'm noticing now. I could be wrong and this comic passes without anyone noticing, but I hope not. Earlier this year, I saw the reaction to the Deadpool movie start something of a rehabilitation of Rob Liefeld. I'm hoping this can do the same for Todd McFarlane. Maybe soon we can look back on comics of the 90s and, while still acknowledging their flaws, appreciate them for what they are.

Or maybe this is just a fun book. I'm more than happy with that outcome.

Something is weird with Free Comic Book Day. Don't know what, not that bothered.

Something is weird with Free Comic Book Day. Don't know what, not that bothered.

Counter-Parts #2 Review

Counter-Parts #2 Review